“May there be peace among the gods, 

in heaven and among the stars; 

may there be peace on earth, among men and animals; 

may we not hurt each other; 

may we be generous to each other; 

may we have that intelligence which will guide our life and action; 

may there be peace in our prayer, on our lips and in our hearts.” 

– Sanskrit Prayer.

Advertisements

For a while

Stop for a while
Don’t do anything
Conversation
Browsing
Listening
Reading
Watching
Stuff
Stop stuffing yourself
Media
Food
Stop for a while
Sit down
Lie down
Stand down
Nothing special
In breath or in posture
Don’t do anything
It’s okay
Your back is got
Don’t wonder by whom
Or argue if it’s true
Or believe it so
Your back is got
How long is a while?
Awhile
Don’t put on the brakes
Trying to stop thinking
Think
Don’t think
Breathe
Don’t breathe
Relax
Don’t relax
Squirm
Resist
No control
For a while

150128 Meditation Journal

Alone in silent darkness.

Alone: sat still,

alone without authority,

alone all one.

Silence: but for the night sounds of the building,

the storage heater buzzing as it charges,

the creak groan grind of the freezer,

wind buffeting the window,

an occasional turning of a human in a bed in a nearby room.

Ahh, bed.

Darkness: it being deep in the night

when the early hours become the early morning,

still winter despite our hopes.

I like the winter,

it’s moods and its inwardness.

Darkness: but the lights of the internet,

a glow of a charger.

Only somewhat alone,

only somewhat silent,

only somewhat dark.

I can easily fix two with a mask and earplugs.

The alone part is where it gets really interesting.

Who is watching?

Who is doing?

Who is meditating?

Who is sensing?

Does he think he is different from the thing sensed?

Is he under any influence and so not truly alone?

Is he a he?

Is who a who?

Alone in silent darkness.

A Visit from St. Nicholas

This 1823 poem is largely responsible for the conception of Santa Claus from the mid-nineteenth century to today, including his physical appearance, the night of his visit, his mode of transportation, the number and names of his reindeer, as well as the tradition that he brings toys to children

Wiki

A Visit from St. Nicholas

‘Twas the night before Christmas, when all thro’ the house
Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse;
The stockings were hung by the chimney with care,
In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there;
The children were nestled all snug in their beds,
While visions of sugar plums danc’d in their heads,
And Mama in her ‘kerchief, and I in my cap,
Had just settled our brains for a long winter’s nap —
When out on the lawn there arose such a clatter,
I sprang from the bed to see what was the matter.
Away to the window I flew like a flash,
Tore open the shutters, and threw up the sash.
The moon on the breast of the new fallen snow,
Gave the lustre of mid-day to objects below;
When, what to my wondering eyes should appear,
But a miniature sleigh, and eight tiny reindeer,
With a little old driver, so lively and quick,
I knew in a moment it must be St. Nick.
More rapid than eagles his coursers they came,
And he whistled, and shouted, and call’d them by name:
“Now! Dasher, now! Dancer, now! Prancer and Vixen,
“On! Comet, on! Cupid, on! Donder and Blitzen;
“To the top of the porch! To the top of the wall!
“Now dash away! Dash away! Dash away all!”
As dry leaves before the wild hurricane fly,
When they meet with an obstacle, mount to the sky;
So up to the house-top the coursers they flew,
With the sleigh full of toys — and St. Nicholas too:
And then in a twinkling, I heard on the roof
The prancing and pawing of each little hoof.
As I drew in my head, and was turning around,
Down the chimney St. Nicholas came with a bound:
He was dress’d all in fur, from his head to his foot,
And his clothes were all tarnish’d with ashes and soot;
A bundle of toys was flung on his back,
And he look’d like a peddler just opening his pack:
His eyes — how they twinkled! His dimples: how merry,
His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry;
His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow,
And the beard of his chin was as white as the snow;
The stump of a pipe he held tight in his teeth,
And the smoke it encircled his head like a wreath.
He had a broad face, and a little round belly
That shook when he laugh’d, like a bowl full of jelly:
He was chubby and plump, a right jolly old elf,
And I laugh’d when I saw him in spite of myself;
A wink of his eye and a twist of his head
Soon gave me to know I had nothing to dread.
He spoke not a word, but went straight to his work,
And fill’d all the stockings; then turn’d with a jerk,
And laying his finger aside of his nose
And giving a nod, up the chimney he rose.
He sprung to his sleigh, to his team gave a whistle,
And away they all flew, like the down of a thistle:
But I heard him exclaim, ere he drove out of sight —
Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night.

—Clement Clark Moore

Another take is that Santa is a Siberian Shaman:

Desiderata – 1927 Poem

The advice: “Wear sunscreen”, seemed very suitable for today. I thought it was from a Baz Luhrmann record. Turns out he did the video and some of the music, while Lee Perry, a voice actor read an essay published in the Chicago Tribune: “Advice, like youth, probably just wasted on the young”, written by Mary Schmich. They tagged “Ladies and gentlemen of the class of ’99” to the beginning so it sounded like a college lecture.

Reading about this, I came upon a poem called Desiderata by Max Ehrmann:

Go placidly amid the noise and haste,
and remember what peace there may be in silence.

As far as possible without surrender
be on good terms with all persons.
Speak your truth quietly and clearly;
and listen to others,
even the dull and the ignorant;
they too have their story.
Avoid loud and aggressive persons,
they are vexations to the spirit.

If you compare yourself with others,
you may become vain or bitter;
for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.

Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans.
Keep interested in your own career, however humble;
it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time.
Exercise caution in your business affairs;
for the world is full of trickery.
But let this not blind you to what virtue there is;
many persons strive for high ideals;
and everywhere life is full of heroism.

Be yourself.
Especially, do not feign affection.
Neither be cynical about love;
for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment
it is as perennial as the grass.

Take kindly the counsel of the years,
gracefully surrendering the things of youth.
Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune.
But do not distress yourself with dark imaginings.
Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.

Beyond a wholesome discipline,
be gentle with yourself.
You are a child of the universe,
no less than the trees and the stars;
you have a right to be here.
And whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.

Therefore be at peace with God,
whatever you conceive Him to be,
and whatever your labors and aspirations,
in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul.

With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams,
it is still a beautiful world.
Be cheerful.
Strive to be happy.